Harborough Local Plan 2011-2031, Proposed Submission

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Harborough Local Plan 2011-2031, Proposed Submission

H4 clause 1

Representation ID: 7478

Received: 17/11/2017

Respondent: McCarthy & Stone Retirement Lifestyles Ltd

Agent: The Planning Bureau Ltd.

Representation Summary:

We would like to express our support, in general terms, for Policy H4 'Specialist housing' which incorporates support for 'Sheltered and Extra Care Accommodation' within both residential areas and within residential developments of over 100 dwellings.

Full text:

See attachment for full representation.
We would like to express our support, in general terms, for Policy H4 'Specialist housing' which incorporates support for 'Sheltered and Extra Care Accommodation' within both residential areas and within residential developments of over 100 dwellings.
Notwithstanding the above, we do have some concerns over some aspects of the wording of the supporting text to the aforementioned policy.
The Harborough District Local Plan Proposed Submission confirms that Harborough District has an ageing population, and states that this is more so than the national average. The document identifies the need for specialist housing over the plan period to be 51 dwellings per annum or 1,267 dwellings over the plan period. We commend the Council for taking a proactive approach in assessing the housing needs of its ageing population.
In line with the rest of the country, the document identifies Key Issue 2: Meeting Housing Needs which demonstrates an acceptance that the demographic profile of the Authority is projected to age. The largest proportional increases in the older population are expected to be of the 'frail' elderly, those aged 85 and over, who are more likely to require specialist care and accommodation provided by Extra Care accommodation. It is therefore clear that the provision of adequate support and accommodation for the increasingly ageing demographic profile of the Borough is a significant challenge.
Unless properly planned for, there is likely to be a serious shortfall in specialist accommodation for the older population in the district, which will have a knock on effect in meeting the housing needs of the whole area and wider policy objectives. Specialist accommodation for the elderly, such as that provided by McCarthy and Stone, will therefore have a vital role in meeting the areas housing needs.
We would advocate that the Council continues in taking a positive approach in seeking to provide appropriate accommodation to meet the needs of its ageing population within the Local Plan. We consider that the best approach towards meeting the diverse housing needs of older people is one that encourages both the delivery of specialist forms of accommodation such as sheltered / retirement housing and Extra Care accommodation. While we commend the council for the inclusion of Policy H4 'Specialist Housing which seeks to meet the need for accommodation for the elderly population we believe that the supporting text should be amended to reflect that most forms of extra care accommodation should be classified as Use Class C2.
We also note that Para 5.3.10 of the Proposed Submission Local Plan states: "it is recognized that provision of affordable housing may be particularly difficult to achieve in relation to extra care schemes and other types of supported living schemes. In such circumstances, the policy will be implemented on a case by case basis, and the individual viability assessment and its review will be used to demonstrate an appropriate affordable housing requirement / commuted sum." We welcome this approach, however it should be stressed where Extra Care accommodation falls under use class C2 it should not be liable for affordable housing.
Extra Care accommodation, provides a valuable form of specialised accommodation, which meets a specific housing need. In so doing, it gives rise to significant planning and social benefits which realise other planning objectives that national and regional policy give priority to. It provides purpose-built, specifically designed accommodation in a safe and secure environment including companionship whilst allowing an independent lifestyle. Safety, security and companionship reduces anxieties and maintains health and general wellbeing. It also provides a form of housing which meets better the on-set and increasing problems of mobility/frailty while maintaining an independent lifestyle.
One of the main distinguishing features between a residential use (C3) and a care/residential institutional use (C2) is the degree of personal care for the person living in the accommodation. Care needs are assessed prior to entry and residents select the most appropriate level of care for their needs and the level of care provided can be modified in response to the changing needs of the residents. Staff provide 24 hour cover for the benefit of the residents, and typically consist of a Manager, assisted by a team of Deputy Managers and support staff, who provide assistance with daily activities and care to residents, as well as a chef and grounds management. In a typical 50 unit scheme, there is a mix of full and part time positions which broadly equates to between 14-17 full time equivalent posts. It should be noted that some personnel take on a dual role providing both care as well as other duties and a rota system is operated.
We would like to highlight the advice provide in the Housing in Later Life: Planning Ahead for Specialist Housing for Older People toolkit. This toolkit was developed by a consortium of private and public organisations with an interest in housing for the elderly and encourages a joined up approach to planning, housing and social care policy both in the collection of evidence and the development of specialist accommodation for the elderly. A copy of this document has been appended for your convenience. Whilst we appreciate that no one planning approach will be appropriate for all areas, an example policy is provided that, we hope, will provide a useful reference for the Council (see attached document).
Specialist accommodation for the elderly also usually provides an element of care and communal facilities at an additional cost to the developer. This requires a critical mass of residents in order to be feasible and small scale developments of specialist housing for the elderly could not be realistically asked to provide or maintain such facilities. It is therefore unlikely to expect the provision of specialist accommodation for the elderly to be met piecemeal in general needs housing developments.
Well located and designed specialist housing for older home owners is a highly sustainable form of housing. Given the critical need for older persons accommodation in Harborough District there should be a presumption in favour of sustainable housing and in particular specialist housing which is being proposed on suitable sites. This accommodation will come from a number of sources both public and private and with varying levels of care and shelter provision enabling individual people to remain in their own home with independence and security.

Object

Harborough Local Plan 2011-2031, Proposed Submission

5.7 H4 Explanation

Representation ID: 7479

Received: 17/11/2017

Respondent: McCarthy & Stone Retirement Lifestyles Ltd

Agent: The Planning Bureau Ltd.

Legally compliant? Not specified

Sound? Not specified

Duty to co-operate? Not specified

Representation Summary:

We consider that the best approach towards meeting the diverse housing needs of older people is one that encourages both the delivery of specialist forms of accommodation such as sheltered / retirement housing and Extra Care accommodation. While we commend the council for the inclusion of Policy H4 'Specialist Housing which seeks to meet the need for accommodation for the elderly population we believe that the supporting text should be amended to reflect that most forms of extra care accommodation should be classified as Use Class C2.

Full text:

See attachment for full representation.
We would like to express our support, in general terms, for Policy H4 'Specialist housing' which incorporates support for 'Sheltered and Extra Care Accommodation' within both residential areas and within residential developments of over 100 dwellings.
Notwithstanding the above, we do have some concerns over some aspects of the wording of the supporting text to the aforementioned policy.
The Harborough District Local Plan Proposed Submission confirms that Harborough District has an ageing population, and states that this is more so than the national average. The document identifies the need for specialist housing over the plan period to be 51 dwellings per annum or 1,267 dwellings over the plan period. We commend the Council for taking a proactive approach in assessing the housing needs of its ageing population.
In line with the rest of the country, the document identifies Key Issue 2: Meeting Housing Needs which demonstrates an acceptance that the demographic profile of the Authority is projected to age. The largest proportional increases in the older population are expected to be of the 'frail' elderly, those aged 85 and over, who are more likely to require specialist care and accommodation provided by Extra Care accommodation. It is therefore clear that the provision of adequate support and accommodation for the increasingly ageing demographic profile of the Borough is a significant challenge.
Unless properly planned for, there is likely to be a serious shortfall in specialist accommodation for the older population in the district, which will have a knock on effect in meeting the housing needs of the whole area and wider policy objectives. Specialist accommodation for the elderly, such as that provided by McCarthy and Stone, will therefore have a vital role in meeting the areas housing needs.
We would advocate that the Council continues in taking a positive approach in seeking to provide appropriate accommodation to meet the needs of its ageing population within the Local Plan. We consider that the best approach towards meeting the diverse housing needs of older people is one that encourages both the delivery of specialist forms of accommodation such as sheltered / retirement housing and Extra Care accommodation. While we commend the council for the inclusion of Policy H4 'Specialist Housing which seeks to meet the need for accommodation for the elderly population we believe that the supporting text should be amended to reflect that most forms of extra care accommodation should be classified as Use Class C2.
We also note that Para 5.3.10 of the Proposed Submission Local Plan states: "it is recognized that provision of affordable housing may be particularly difficult to achieve in relation to extra care schemes and other types of supported living schemes. In such circumstances, the policy will be implemented on a case by case basis, and the individual viability assessment and its review will be used to demonstrate an appropriate affordable housing requirement / commuted sum." We welcome this approach, however it should be stressed where Extra Care accommodation falls under use class C2 it should not be liable for affordable housing.
Extra Care accommodation, provides a valuable form of specialised accommodation, which meets a specific housing need. In so doing, it gives rise to significant planning and social benefits which realise other planning objectives that national and regional policy give priority to. It provides purpose-built, specifically designed accommodation in a safe and secure environment including companionship whilst allowing an independent lifestyle. Safety, security and companionship reduces anxieties and maintains health and general wellbeing. It also provides a form of housing which meets better the on-set and increasing problems of mobility/frailty while maintaining an independent lifestyle.
One of the main distinguishing features between a residential use (C3) and a care/residential institutional use (C2) is the degree of personal care for the person living in the accommodation. Care needs are assessed prior to entry and residents select the most appropriate level of care for their needs and the level of care provided can be modified in response to the changing needs of the residents. Staff provide 24 hour cover for the benefit of the residents, and typically consist of a Manager, assisted by a team of Deputy Managers and support staff, who provide assistance with daily activities and care to residents, as well as a chef and grounds management. In a typical 50 unit scheme, there is a mix of full and part time positions which broadly equates to between 14-17 full time equivalent posts. It should be noted that some personnel take on a dual role providing both care as well as other duties and a rota system is operated.
We would like to highlight the advice provide in the Housing in Later Life: Planning Ahead for Specialist Housing for Older People toolkit. This toolkit was developed by a consortium of private and public organisations with an interest in housing for the elderly and encourages a joined up approach to planning, housing and social care policy both in the collection of evidence and the development of specialist accommodation for the elderly. A copy of this document has been appended for your convenience. Whilst we appreciate that no one planning approach will be appropriate for all areas, an example policy is provided that, we hope, will provide a useful reference for the Council (see attached document).
Specialist accommodation for the elderly also usually provides an element of care and communal facilities at an additional cost to the developer. This requires a critical mass of residents in order to be feasible and small scale developments of specialist housing for the elderly could not be realistically asked to provide or maintain such facilities. It is therefore unlikely to expect the provision of specialist accommodation for the elderly to be met piecemeal in general needs housing developments.
Well located and designed specialist housing for older home owners is a highly sustainable form of housing. Given the critical need for older persons accommodation in Harborough District there should be a presumption in favour of sustainable housing and in particular specialist housing which is being proposed on suitable sites. This accommodation will come from a number of sources both public and private and with varying levels of care and shelter provision enabling individual people to remain in their own home with independence and security.

Object

Harborough Local Plan 2011-2031, Proposed Submission

5.3.9 to 5.3.10 Explanation

Representation ID: 7481

Received: 17/11/2017

Respondent: McCarthy & Stone Retirement Lifestyles Ltd

Agent: The Planning Bureau Ltd.

Legally compliant? Not specified

Sound? Not specified

Duty to co-operate? Not specified

Representation Summary:

We note the reference to implementation on a case by case basis in Para 5.3.10 of the Proposed Submission Local Plan in relation to extra care schemes and other types of supported living schemes. We welcome this approach, however it should be stressed where Extra Care accommodation falls under use class C2 it should not be liable for affordable housing.

Full text:

See attachment for full representation.
We would like to express our support, in general terms, for Policy H4 'Specialist housing' which incorporates support for 'Sheltered and Extra Care Accommodation' within both residential areas and within residential developments of over 100 dwellings.
Notwithstanding the above, we do have some concerns over some aspects of the wording of the supporting text to the aforementioned policy.
The Harborough District Local Plan Proposed Submission confirms that Harborough District has an ageing population, and states that this is more so than the national average. The document identifies the need for specialist housing over the plan period to be 51 dwellings per annum or 1,267 dwellings over the plan period. We commend the Council for taking a proactive approach in assessing the housing needs of its ageing population.
In line with the rest of the country, the document identifies Key Issue 2: Meeting Housing Needs which demonstrates an acceptance that the demographic profile of the Authority is projected to age. The largest proportional increases in the older population are expected to be of the 'frail' elderly, those aged 85 and over, who are more likely to require specialist care and accommodation provided by Extra Care accommodation. It is therefore clear that the provision of adequate support and accommodation for the increasingly ageing demographic profile of the Borough is a significant challenge.
Unless properly planned for, there is likely to be a serious shortfall in specialist accommodation for the older population in the district, which will have a knock on effect in meeting the housing needs of the whole area and wider policy objectives. Specialist accommodation for the elderly, such as that provided by McCarthy and Stone, will therefore have a vital role in meeting the areas housing needs.
We would advocate that the Council continues in taking a positive approach in seeking to provide appropriate accommodation to meet the needs of its ageing population within the Local Plan. We consider that the best approach towards meeting the diverse housing needs of older people is one that encourages both the delivery of specialist forms of accommodation such as sheltered / retirement housing and Extra Care accommodation. While we commend the council for the inclusion of Policy H4 'Specialist Housing which seeks to meet the need for accommodation for the elderly population we believe that the supporting text should be amended to reflect that most forms of extra care accommodation should be classified as Use Class C2.
We also note that Para 5.3.10 of the Proposed Submission Local Plan states: "it is recognized that provision of affordable housing may be particularly difficult to achieve in relation to extra care schemes and other types of supported living schemes. In such circumstances, the policy will be implemented on a case by case basis, and the individual viability assessment and its review will be used to demonstrate an appropriate affordable housing requirement / commuted sum." We welcome this approach, however it should be stressed where Extra Care accommodation falls under use class C2 it should not be liable for affordable housing.
Extra Care accommodation, provides a valuable form of specialised accommodation, which meets a specific housing need. In so doing, it gives rise to significant planning and social benefits which realise other planning objectives that national and regional policy give priority to. It provides purpose-built, specifically designed accommodation in a safe and secure environment including companionship whilst allowing an independent lifestyle. Safety, security and companionship reduces anxieties and maintains health and general wellbeing. It also provides a form of housing which meets better the on-set and increasing problems of mobility/frailty while maintaining an independent lifestyle.
One of the main distinguishing features between a residential use (C3) and a care/residential institutional use (C2) is the degree of personal care for the person living in the accommodation. Care needs are assessed prior to entry and residents select the most appropriate level of care for their needs and the level of care provided can be modified in response to the changing needs of the residents. Staff provide 24 hour cover for the benefit of the residents, and typically consist of a Manager, assisted by a team of Deputy Managers and support staff, who provide assistance with daily activities and care to residents, as well as a chef and grounds management. In a typical 50 unit scheme, there is a mix of full and part time positions which broadly equates to between 14-17 full time equivalent posts. It should be noted that some personnel take on a dual role providing both care as well as other duties and a rota system is operated.
We would like to highlight the advice provide in the Housing in Later Life: Planning Ahead for Specialist Housing for Older People toolkit. This toolkit was developed by a consortium of private and public organisations with an interest in housing for the elderly and encourages a joined up approach to planning, housing and social care policy both in the collection of evidence and the development of specialist accommodation for the elderly. A copy of this document has been appended for your convenience. Whilst we appreciate that no one planning approach will be appropriate for all areas, an example policy is provided that, we hope, will provide a useful reference for the Council (see attached document).
Specialist accommodation for the elderly also usually provides an element of care and communal facilities at an additional cost to the developer. This requires a critical mass of residents in order to be feasible and small scale developments of specialist housing for the elderly could not be realistically asked to provide or maintain such facilities. It is therefore unlikely to expect the provision of specialist accommodation for the elderly to be met piecemeal in general needs housing developments.
Well located and designed specialist housing for older home owners is a highly sustainable form of housing. Given the critical need for older persons accommodation in Harborough District there should be a presumption in favour of sustainable housing and in particular specialist housing which is being proposed on suitable sites. This accommodation will come from a number of sources both public and private and with varying levels of care and shelter provision enabling individual people to remain in their own home with independence and security.

Support

Harborough Local Plan 2011-2031, Proposed Submission

H4 clause 2

Representation ID: 7482

Received: 17/11/2017

Respondent: McCarthy & Stone Retirement Lifestyles Ltd

Agent: The Planning Bureau Ltd.

Representation Summary:

Specialist accommodation for the elderly also usually provides an element of care and communal facilities at an additional cost to the developer. This requires a critical mass of residents in order to be feasible and small scale developments of specialist housing for the elderly could not be realistically asked to provide or maintain such facilities. It is therefore unlikely to expect the provision of specialist accommodation for the elderly to be met piecemeal in general needs housing developments.

Given the critical need for older persons accommodation in Harborough District there should be a presumption in favour of sustainable housing and in particular specialist housing which is being proposed on suitable sites.

Full text:

See attachment for full representation.
We would like to express our support, in general terms, for Policy H4 'Specialist housing' which incorporates support for 'Sheltered and Extra Care Accommodation' within both residential areas and within residential developments of over 100 dwellings.
Notwithstanding the above, we do have some concerns over some aspects of the wording of the supporting text to the aforementioned policy.
The Harborough District Local Plan Proposed Submission confirms that Harborough District has an ageing population, and states that this is more so than the national average. The document identifies the need for specialist housing over the plan period to be 51 dwellings per annum or 1,267 dwellings over the plan period. We commend the Council for taking a proactive approach in assessing the housing needs of its ageing population.
In line with the rest of the country, the document identifies Key Issue 2: Meeting Housing Needs which demonstrates an acceptance that the demographic profile of the Authority is projected to age. The largest proportional increases in the older population are expected to be of the 'frail' elderly, those aged 85 and over, who are more likely to require specialist care and accommodation provided by Extra Care accommodation. It is therefore clear that the provision of adequate support and accommodation for the increasingly ageing demographic profile of the Borough is a significant challenge.
Unless properly planned for, there is likely to be a serious shortfall in specialist accommodation for the older population in the district, which will have a knock on effect in meeting the housing needs of the whole area and wider policy objectives. Specialist accommodation for the elderly, such as that provided by McCarthy and Stone, will therefore have a vital role in meeting the areas housing needs.
We would advocate that the Council continues in taking a positive approach in seeking to provide appropriate accommodation to meet the needs of its ageing population within the Local Plan. We consider that the best approach towards meeting the diverse housing needs of older people is one that encourages both the delivery of specialist forms of accommodation such as sheltered / retirement housing and Extra Care accommodation. While we commend the council for the inclusion of Policy H4 'Specialist Housing which seeks to meet the need for accommodation for the elderly population we believe that the supporting text should be amended to reflect that most forms of extra care accommodation should be classified as Use Class C2.
We also note that Para 5.3.10 of the Proposed Submission Local Plan states: "it is recognized that provision of affordable housing may be particularly difficult to achieve in relation to extra care schemes and other types of supported living schemes. In such circumstances, the policy will be implemented on a case by case basis, and the individual viability assessment and its review will be used to demonstrate an appropriate affordable housing requirement / commuted sum." We welcome this approach, however it should be stressed where Extra Care accommodation falls under use class C2 it should not be liable for affordable housing.
Extra Care accommodation, provides a valuable form of specialised accommodation, which meets a specific housing need. In so doing, it gives rise to significant planning and social benefits which realise other planning objectives that national and regional policy give priority to. It provides purpose-built, specifically designed accommodation in a safe and secure environment including companionship whilst allowing an independent lifestyle. Safety, security and companionship reduces anxieties and maintains health and general wellbeing. It also provides a form of housing which meets better the on-set and increasing problems of mobility/frailty while maintaining an independent lifestyle.
One of the main distinguishing features between a residential use (C3) and a care/residential institutional use (C2) is the degree of personal care for the person living in the accommodation. Care needs are assessed prior to entry and residents select the most appropriate level of care for their needs and the level of care provided can be modified in response to the changing needs of the residents. Staff provide 24 hour cover for the benefit of the residents, and typically consist of a Manager, assisted by a team of Deputy Managers and support staff, who provide assistance with daily activities and care to residents, as well as a chef and grounds management. In a typical 50 unit scheme, there is a mix of full and part time positions which broadly equates to between 14-17 full time equivalent posts. It should be noted that some personnel take on a dual role providing both care as well as other duties and a rota system is operated.
We would like to highlight the advice provide in the Housing in Later Life: Planning Ahead for Specialist Housing for Older People toolkit. This toolkit was developed by a consortium of private and public organisations with an interest in housing for the elderly and encourages a joined up approach to planning, housing and social care policy both in the collection of evidence and the development of specialist accommodation for the elderly. A copy of this document has been appended for your convenience. Whilst we appreciate that no one planning approach will be appropriate for all areas, an example policy is provided that, we hope, will provide a useful reference for the Council (see attached document).
Specialist accommodation for the elderly also usually provides an element of care and communal facilities at an additional cost to the developer. This requires a critical mass of residents in order to be feasible and small scale developments of specialist housing for the elderly could not be realistically asked to provide or maintain such facilities. It is therefore unlikely to expect the provision of specialist accommodation for the elderly to be met piecemeal in general needs housing developments.
Well located and designed specialist housing for older home owners is a highly sustainable form of housing. Given the critical need for older persons accommodation in Harborough District there should be a presumption in favour of sustainable housing and in particular specialist housing which is being proposed on suitable sites. This accommodation will come from a number of sources both public and private and with varying levels of care and shelter provision enabling individual people to remain in their own home with independence and security.

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